SAT Vocabulary Groups
 SAT Vocabulary in Sentences
I'm hovering in a makeshift kitchen, watching one of Italy's most eminent marine biologists gleefully playing chef.
a. makeshift
serving as a temporary substitute; sufficient for the time being
It's important to have a multilayered, deep defensive posture and not to rely on a single perimeter approach to mitigate risk.
v. mitigate
make less severe, serious, or painful.
It was agreed without further argument that the milk and the windfall apples should be reserved for the pigs alone.
n. windfall
an apple or other fruit blown down from a tree or bush by the wind.
We prefer to be seen with each other, instead of looking at each other: the back of selfie is vanity.
n. selfie
a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website.
Davi was born without fully developed limbs but he's not been discouraged, despite the haphazard nature of facilities in Brazil; "Sport is my life because without sport I'm not Davi, " he said, brimming with confidence.
n. haphazard
lacking any obvious principle of organization.
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SAT Vocabulary with Sentence

Like all English language tests, SAT will check the vocabulary capability of test takers. No matter what questions on test papers, both reading and writing rely on actual vocabulary skill to get high score. A strong SAT vocabulary may not ensure a good score; however the reverse is true: a weak vocabulary will lead a bad SAT result. So building SAT vocabulary is the most important job when you prepare this test.

Students have various ways to build own SAT vocabulary.One method is to learn new words from samples and contexts. When you study or review words, especially difficult words, good examples help very much. These sentences not only let you understand new words precisely, but also push you to use new words confidently. As long as you bind them with sentences, they can improve your performance in all SAT test sections, especially in writing test.

Here we list 200 difficult SAT words and their example sentences. Many of the sentences are selected from media or Internet. The real and alive English sentences give you actual context samples, which help to memorize hard SAT words by context and trigger inspiration to use them in SAT writing test.

A list of 200 words is a relatively small SAT vocabulary. It's far away from actual SAT vocabulary demand. None can take such a short list as only asset to pass SAT test. However, considering it's a short and difficult word list, it can be used to evaluate SAT vocabulary skill quickly. Some SAT test takers also use it as a supplement material in short training.

The key point of this small SAT vocabulary is its sentences, which are excellent examples of how to use these words. Leveraging the sentences, students can take this small SAT vocabulary as a very useful resource to enhance words for writing test. This is the reason we revise the example sentences from time to time. Learn hard word with sentence may costs more time, but your reading and writing are both enhanced, it's sort of to kill two birds with one stone.


[6 Words Quick View]

buffet: Read
/'bʊfeɪ/;/bə'feɪ/ n.
table with food set out for people to serve themselves; meal at which people help themselves to food that's been set out
Please convey them on the tray to the buffet.

buttress: Read
/'bʌtrɪs/ v. Syn. support
support physically; prop up; support something or someone by supplying evidence
The attorney came up with several far-fetched arguments in a vain attempt to buttress his weak case.

cajole: Read
/kə'dʒoʊl/ v.
influence or urge by gentle urging or flattering
Diane tried to cajole her father into letting her drive the family car.

capricious: Read
/kə'prɪʃəs/ a. Syn. unpredictable; fickle; arbitrary
fickle; impulsive and unpredictable; apt to change opinions suddenly
The storm was capricious: it changed course constantly.

cogent: Read
/'koʊdʒənt/ a. Syn. convincing
reasonable and convincing; based on evidence; forcefully persuasive
It was inevitable that David chose to go to Harvard: he had several cogent reasons for doing so, including a full-tuition scholarship.

conflagration: Read
/kɒnflə'greɪʃ(ə)n/ a.
large destructive fire; burning; large-scale military conflict
After the conflagration had finally died down, the city center was nothing but a mass of blackened embers.

......

antipathy  Read
Exercise
make amends or pay the penalty for; relieve or cleanse of guilt
Exercise
strong feeling of aversion; dislike
Exercise
table with food set out for people to serve themselves; meal at which people help themselves to food that's been set out
Exercise
violate with violence, especially to sacred place
buffet  Read
Exercise
pollute; make dirty or spotty
Exercise
avoid; refuse to use or participate in; stand aloof from
Exercise
having harmful effect; injurious; having quality of destroying life; noxious; poisonous
Exercise
table with food set out for people to serve themselves; meal at which people help themselves to food that's been set out
buttress  Read
Exercise
support physically; prop up; support something or someone by supplying evidence
Exercise
very bad; extremely inferiorl; intolerable; very hateful
Exercise
impenetrable; incapable of being damaged or distressed
Exercise
fickle; impulsive and unpredictable; apt to change opinions suddenly
cajole  Read
Exercise
violate with violence, especially to sacred place
Exercise
impenetrable; incapable of being damaged or distressed
Exercise
influence or urge by gentle urging or flattering
Exercise
tending to depart from main point or cover a wide range of subjects
ephemeral  Read
Exercise
showing excitement; overflowing with enthusiasm
Exercise
short-lived; enduring a very short time
Exercise
difficult to please; having complicated requirements; excessively particular demanding about details
Exercise
noisy speech; speech or piece of writing with strong feeling or expression
eschew  Read
Exercise
infringe; advance beyond usual limit; make physical impact on; touch
Exercise
still in existence; not destroyed, lost, or extinct
Exercise
avoid; refuse to use or participate in; stand aloof from
Exercise
fickle; impulsive and unpredictable; apt to change opinions suddenly
evanescent  Read
Exercise
tending to depart from main point or cover a wide range of subjects
Exercise
mildness, as of the weather; merciful, kind, or lenient act
Exercise
spreading harmfully in a subtle manner; designed or adapted to entrap
Exercise
fleeting; vanishing or likely to vanish like vapor
exculpate  Read
Exercise
pronounce not guilty of criminal charges
Exercise
showing excitement; overflowing with enthusiasm
Exercise
without hap or luck; luckless; unfortunate; unlucky; unhappy
Exercise
domination, influence, or authority over another, especially by political group or nation over others
extant  Read
Exercise
having harmful effect; injurious; having quality of destroying life; noxious; poisonous
Exercise
still in existence; not destroyed, lost, or extinct
Exercise
impenetrable; incapable of being damaged or distressed
Exercise
inclined to make trouble; disobedient; irritable
feral  Read
Exercise
naive and trusting; young; unsophisticated
Exercise
blessing; benefit bestowed, especially in response to a request
Exercise
not domestic; wild; existing in wild or untamed state
Exercise
unpleasant-smelling; having offensive smell; stinking
Read [Esc]
/æb'dʒʊə(r)/ v. Syn. renounce; abandon
renounce upon oath; abandon forever
He will [___] his allegiance to the king.


Spelling Word: abjure
Read [Esc]
/ə'sɪdjʊəs/;/ə'sɪdʒʊəs/ a. Syn. diligent; persistent
constant in application or attention; diligent; unceasing or persistent
He was [___], working at this task for weeks before he felt satisfied with his results.


Spelling Word: assiduous
Read [Esc]
/'bɜrnɪʃ/ v. Syn. polish
make shiny by rubbing; polish
I [___] the brass fixtures until they reflect the lamplight.


Spelling Word: burnish
Read [Esc]
/kə'prɪʃəs/ a. Syn. unpredictable; fickle; arbitrary
fickle; impulsive and unpredictable; apt to change opinions suddenly
The storm was capricious: it changed course constantly.


Spelling Word: capricious
Read [Esc]
/'klɛmənsɪ/ n.
mildness, as of the weather; merciful, kind, or lenient act
The lawyer was pleased when the case was sent to Judge Smith's chambers because Smith was noted for her [___] toward first offenders.


Spelling Word: clemency
Read [Esc]
/kɒnflə'greɪʃ(ə)n/ a.
large destructive fire; burning; large-scale military conflict
After the [___] had finally died down, the city center was nothing but a mass of blackened embers.


Spelling Word: conflagration
Read [Esc]
/dɪ'kraɪ/ v. Syn. disparage
express strong disapproval of; disparage
The founder of the Children's Defense Fund, Marian Wright Edelman, would strongly [___] the lack of financial and moral support for children in America today.


Spelling Word: decry
Read [Esc]
/dɪ'mjʊə(r)/ a. Syn. grave; serious
modest and reserved in manner or behavior
She was [___] and reserved, a nice modest girl whom any young man would be proud to take home to his mother.


Spelling Word: demure
Read [Esc]
/ɪ'bʌlɪənt/ a.
showing excitement; overflowing with enthusiasm
Amy's [___] nature could not be repressed; she' was always bubbling over with excitement.


Spelling Word: ebullient
Read [Esc]
/ɪ'vɪns/ v. Syn. manifest
show or demonstrate clearly; overcome; conquer
When he tried to answer the questions, I heard he [___] his ignorance of the subject matter.


Spelling Word: evince